Quotation by Oscar Wilde

There should be a law that no ordinary newspaper should be allowed to write about art. The harm they do by their foolish and random writing it would be impossible to overestimate—not to the artist but to the public.... Without them we would judge a man simply by his work; but at present the newspapers are trying hard to induce the public to judge a sculptor, for instance, never by his statues but by the way he treats his wife; a painter by the amount of his income and a poet by the colour of his necktie.
Oscar Wilde (1854–1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Art and the Handicraftsman," Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991).

Manuscript written 1882 in Philadelphia for a lecture.
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