Quotation by Andrew Carnegie

This, then, is held to be the duty of the man of wealth: First, to set an example of modest, unostentatious living, shunning display or extravagance; to provide moderately for the legitimate wants of those dependent upon him; and, after doing so, to consider all surplus revenues which come to him simply as trust funds, which he is called upon to administer, and strictly bound as a matter of duty to administer in the manner which, in his judgment, is best calculated to produce the most beneficial results for the community—the man of wealth thus becoming the mere trustee and agent for his poorer brethren, bringing to their service his superior wisdom, experience and ability to administer, doing for them better than they would or could do for themselves.
Andrew Carnegie (1835–1919), U.S. industrialist, philanthropist. Quoted in Burton J. Hendrick, Life of Andrew Carnegie, vol. 1, ch. 17 (1932). "The Gospel of Wealth," North American Review (June 1889).
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