Quotation by Charles Sanders Peirce

We may say that feelings have two kinds of intensity. One is the intensity of the feeling itself, by which loud sounds are distinguished from faint ones, luminous colors from dark ones, highly chromatic colors from almost neutral tints, etc. The other is the intensity of consciousness that lays hold of the feeling, which makes the ticking of a watch actually heard infinitely more vivid than a cannon shot remembered to have been heard a few minutes ago.
Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. An undated manuscript. "Some Logical Phenomena," Collected Papers, vol. 7, para. 545, Harvard University Press (1934).

in para. 555, Peirce calls these objective and subjective intensity.
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