Quotation by Bertrand Russell

When I was a boy, I had a clock with a pendulum that could be lifted off. I found that the clock went very much faster without the pendulum. If the main purpose of a clock is to go, the clock was the better for losing its pendulum. True, it could no longer tell the time, but that did not matter if one could teach oneself to be indifferent to the passage of time. The linguistic philosophy which cares only about language and not about the world, is like the boy who preferred the clock without the pendulum because, although it no longer told the time, it went more easily than before and at a more exhilarating pace.
Bertrand Russell (1872–1970), British philosopher, logician, activist, pacifist. Words and Things, introduction, p. 15, E. Gellner with introduction by Bertrand Russell (1960).

Reminiscent of the same author's statement (attributed) that "linguistic philosophy is the attempt to obtain through theft what one has been unable to gain by honest toil."
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