Quotation by Mark Twain

When the doctrine of allegiance to party can utterly up-end a man's moral constitution and make a temporary fool of him besides, what excuse are you going to offer for preaching it, teaching it, extending it, perpetuating it? Shall you say, the best good of the country demands allegiance to party? Shall you also say it demands that a man kick his truth and his conscience into the gutter, and become a mouthing lunatic, besides?
Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910), U.S. author. paper, read at Hartford, Connecticut in 1884, repr. In Complete Essays, ed. Charles Neider (1963). "Consistency," (1923).
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