Quotation by Shakespeare

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste.
Then can I drown an eye, unus'd to flow.
For precious friends hid in death's dateless night
And weep afresh love's long since cancell'd woe,
And moan th' expense of many a vanish'd sight.
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone.
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restor'd and sorrows end.
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. Whne to the sessions of sweet silent thought (l. 1–14). . .

The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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