Quotation by Henry David Thoreau

Who has not imagined to himself a country inn, where the traveler shall really feel in, and at home, and at his public house, who was before at his private house?—whose host is indeed a host, and a lord of the land, a self-appointed brother of his race; called to his place, beside, by all the winds of heaven and his good genius, as truly as the preacher is called to preach; a man of such universal sympathies, and so broad and genial a human nature, that he would fain sacrifice the tender but narrow ties of private friendship to a broad, sun-shiny, fair-weather-and- foul friendship for his race; who loves men, not as a philosopher, with philanthropy, nor as an overseer of the poor, with charity, but by a necessity of his nature, as he loves dogs and horses; and standing at his open door from morning till night would fain see more and more of them come along the highway, and is never satiated. To him the sun and moon are but travelers, the one by day and the other by night; and they too patronize his house.
Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Landlord" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 154, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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