Quotation by Ralph Waldo Emerson

With what joy I begin to read a poem, which I confide in as an inspiration! And now my chains are to be broken; I shall mount above these clouds and opaque airs in which I live,—opaque, though they seem transparent,—and from the heaven of truth I shall see and comprehend my relations. That will reconcile me to life, and renovate nature, to see trifles animated by tendency, and to know what I am doing. Life will no more be a noise; now I shall see men and women, and know the signs by which they may be discerned from fools and satans. This day shall be better than my birth-days: then I became an animal: now I am invited into the science of the real.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Poet," Essays, Second Series (1844).

Reading as a form of baptism!
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