Quotation by Henry David Thoreau

. . . the ship struck at ten minutes after four A.M., and all hands, being mostly in their nightclothes, made haste to the forecastle, the water coming in at once. There they remained; the passengers in the forecastle, the crew above it, doing what they could. Every wave lifed the forecastle roof and washed over those within. The first man got ashore at nine; many from nine to noon. At flood-tide, about half past three o'clock, when the ship broke up entirely, they came out of the forecastle, and Margaret sat with her back to the foremast, with her hands on her knees, her husband and child already drowned. A great wave came and washed her aft. The steward (?) had just before taken her child and started for shore. Both were drowned.
Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, July 25, 1850, to Ralph Waldo Emerson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, pp. 183-184, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

Recounting the deaths of Margaret Fuller, her husband, The Marquis of Ossoli, and their child.
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