Quotation by Shakespeare

who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered country from whose bourn
No traveler returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought.
William Shakespeare (1564–1616), British poet. Hamlet (V, i).

The "fardels" or burdens of this life are made tolerable by fear of worse after death. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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