Quotation by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

... women learned one important lesson—namely, that it is impossible for the best of men to understand women's feelings or the humiliation of their position. When they asked us to be silent on our question during the War, and labor for the emancipation of the slave, we did so, and gave five years to his emancipation and enfranchisement.... I was convinced, at the time, that it was the true policy. I am now equally sure that it was a blunder.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902), U.S. suffragist, author, and social reformer. Eighty Years and More (1815-1897), ch. 16 (1898).

On suffragists' agreement to devote their energies to supporting the Union and the anti-slavery cause during the Civil War. Stanton and many other suffragists were angry and disillusioned when those with and for whom they had worked successfully failed to support the suffrage cause after military victory and emancipation of the slaves. They were also bitter that African American men were now enfranchised, while women of all races still were not.
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